The Society for Aesthetics of Architecture and Visual Arts of Serbia and The Faculty of Architecture - University of Belgrade

The 2015 Interim meeting of the Executive Committee of the IAA will take place June 26-28 2015 at the Amphitheatre of The Faculty of Architecture - University of Belgrade, in Belgrade. The theme is “Revisions of Modem Aesthetics”. All researchers and scholars interested in this topic are invited to participate in the conference with a paper.

Revisions of Modern Aesthetics

Topics:

1) Modern Theories of Space and Architecture

Chair: Jale Erzen, Middle East Technical University, Ankara;

2) The Status of Aesthetics Today

Chair: Ales Eijavec, Institute of Philosophy, Research Center, Slovenian Academy of Sciencies and Arts, Ljubljana;

3) Contemporary and Medieval Art

Chair: Vladimir Mako, Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade;

4) Art and Architecture at the Time of Spectacle and Media

Chair: Misko Suvakovic, Faculty of Music, University of Arts, Belgrade.

One of the important topics of contemporary global culture is revision of modernism and its corresponding theories, aesthetics and philosophies. That is why we have proposed for the Belgrade Conference title “Revision of Modern Aesthetics”. Reviewing the history of modernity and especially aesthetic transformations in the 20th century are a challenging issues for contemporary society and culture. We live in a world of permanent change; a world of desire to get out of the global crisis into the new world of unexpected modernity. Therefore, the project, research, emancipation and the new are the the important questions. Through the paradigmatic models of modernity we will try to construct a theoretical, aesthetic and philosophical platforms for contemporaneity. The concept of the conference we developed in four sessions. The first session deals with the revision, reconstruction and research of modernist theories of space and architecture. The aim is to show the viability of space and architecture in the changing world. The second session deals with questions on the status of contemporary aesthetic that transformed the crisis of modern aesthetics into the expansion of aesthetic thinking, politicization of sensuality and discovering new aesthetic experiences and knowledges. The third session, relying on the idea of “historical distance” indicates a comparison of medieval and modem in arts. The fourth session enters in the field of the fluidity, uncertainty and phenomenological transformatibility of the society of global spectacle and media totality. The Conference “Revisions of Modern Aesthetics” wants to initiate the discussion from the field of contemporary philosophical and applied aesthetics about who we are today compared to the past in relation to the future. Aesthetics has a right to these fundamental questions.

Paper preparation:

Only Word documents will be accepted, the suggested font type and dimension are Times New Roman and 11, the number of page shall be between 5 and 15. In order to select the paper that will be presented during the conference abstracts will be evaluated by a group of experts. Please send your abstract to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. before March 31 2015, you will receive a confirmation of receipt, in case you don’t please re-send your e-mail.

Admission fee:

Students and Ph.D. students 50 euro Academics and all participants 120 euro

The admission fee covers the attendance to the whole conference, related materials, two light lunches and the social dinner.
The web site of the conference is currently under construction and it will be accessible soon.

Paul Ricoeur: Thinker of the Margins?

University of Antwerp & VU-University Amsterdam

September, 18-20, 2014, Antwerp 

Ricoeur can be called the philosopher of all dialogues. He engaged virtually all the great movements of thought, entered into debate with scientists, and voices his concerns in the public debate. He never sought to engage in polemics but tried to engage seemingly unbridgeable positions or thinkers in a fruitful dialogue. Ricoeur was not a radical thinker in search of extremes, but rather committed to mediate between conflicting philosophers and streams of thought, therein lies part of his originality and creativity. Where others sees dichotomy, he sees dialectic. In this regard one cannot but note how often Ricoeur uses the word between (entre) in the titles of his articles, always in search of connections, confrontations, and unexpected syntheses between thinkers who have preceded him. He really is a thinker of the between.

But does Ricoeur’s ‘dialogical approach’ not result in a harmonization of often diverging positions? Is Ricoeur able to hear the radicalness of certain insights? Is it possible that his hermeneutical philosophy takes away the sharpness of certain problems in current religious, political and philosophical debates? Might it even be the case that he did not hear certain voices, precisely because they resist synthesis? This conference inquires what happens to Ricoeur’s hermeneutical approach if we confront it with its limits.

The conference will address topical philosophical, socio-political and religious issues, from a Ricoeurian perspective, but in conversation with other, more ‘radical’ thinkers

Possible topics include:

Justice and the Struggle for Recognition: Justice is an important concept in Ricoeur’s work, first of all, as an ethical concept. For Ricoeur, justice is a way of establishing peace, both in concrete relations to others, as on the level of institutions. In The Course of Recognition, Ricoeur however shifts the focus on political philosophy, and, in so doing he creates a tension in his understanding of justice. On the one hand, he agrees with Hegel and Honneth that justice is a justification for violence that is part of “the struggle for recognition”. On the other hand, Ricoeur also points again to the role of justice for peace. As he argues with Marcel Hénaff, in the exchange of gifts for instance, the parties involved proof their recognition to one another, and, in this sense, they maintain a peaceful relationship. This session aims at investigating the tension between justice and recognition in Ricoeur’s work, and especially in The Course of Recognition 

  • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">
    • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">Ricoeur, the Religious Other and Interreligious Dialogue: In the vast collection of his writings Ricoeur only sporadically raised the issue of interreligious dialogue. Though Ricoeur was sensitive to issues of religious diversity, interreligious violence and the encounter between religions, he did not engage into a systematic debate on these issues. However Ricoeur’s hermeneutical philosophy may offer a framework enabling a thorough reflection on the challenges presented by the encounter between religions. 
  • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">
    • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">Discourse, Normativity and Power :  The reason that Ricoeur’s thinking is not often mentioned in the context of feminist, queer and race theory is perhaps his consideration of discourse as a “laboratory of thought experiments”, instead of as excluding and normative. On the other hand, his hermeneutics of suspicion, notions of critique and distanciation, and his ideas about the narrative and ethical self do seem interesting for thinking about alterity and difference. For this session, we invite papers that reflect upon Ricoeur’s notion of discourse, and address the question of normativity and power.
  • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">
    • http://www.iaaesthetics.org/plugins/system/jat3/jat3/base-themes/default/images/bullet.gif) 20px 7px no-repeat;">Literature, Identity, Politics: Literary fiction plays an important role in Ricoeur’s hermeneutics of subjectivity, especially with regard to his concept of narrative identity, which enables him to synthesize different aspects of personal identity. Ricoeur is less explicit about the relation between literary fiction and politics. This relation entails, however, vital issues, like for instance the role of fiction in the constitution of a political entity, the (legitimizing, critical or anarchic) function of narratives in political discourse, the power dependency (and transformation) of the narrative imagination, the possibility of politic pluralism, etc. In this session, we intend to critically examine the contribution of Ricoeur’s hermeneutics to these issues.

Editor’s Note:

see also: http://www.eurosa.org/esa2014/

   http://www.eurosa.org/ 

International Conference “Literary Theories and Critiques of Our Time” & 11thAnnual Conference of China Association of Sino-Foreign Literary and Arts Theories (CASFLAT), August 15-19, 2014

Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, China co-sponsored by CASFLAT, Henan University College of Humanities, Section of Literary Theories of Institute of Literature, CASS, and International Association for Aesthetics      

The 11th Annual Conference of CASFLAT on “The Literary Theory and Critique of Our Times” concentrates on the relationship of literary theory and critique to the times, society and contemporary living condition. Theme of 2014 is to restate the commitment of relating literary theoretical studies with the presence of contemporary China, in the hope of exploring the ways to rectifying the separation between theories and practices, and the inadequate introductions and interpretations of the foreign and classical literary theories.

From the President

Springtime in Beijing was, this year, too short. Short and very busy. Some of our good friends visited here, including Ken-ichi Sasaki, Curtis, Carter and Ales Erjavec, and I was very happy to meet them. I will enjoy seeing all of you in between the regular meetings of our Congresses.

Recently, I have attended several conferences in China and elsewhere. In early April, I went to Hangzhou for a symposium on the theoretic significance of Chinese ink-wash painting hosted by Pan Gongkai. We had a very good discussion there on the famous West Lake garden, a place traditionally called "Paradise on Earth" in China. Our friends, Curtis Carter, Richard Shusterman and Peng Feng, gave excellent presentations there. We also met other scholars including François Jullien and Cheng Chung-ying. Two topics discussed were especially interesting and deserve mention here: first, the physical brushwork as the traces of human action to signify the feeling and emotion, or states of mind of the painters, and second, the brushwork as the evidence of the painter's character as a morally exemplary human being. These two concepts represent two interrelated ways of thinking about and interpreting Chinese ink-wash painting.

A little later in April, I went to Chengdu (The city where many of us met in 2006. I hope you still remember this city where the Executive Committee meeting of IAA voted to approve Beijing as the venue for the 2010 IAA Congress). At this 2014 Chengdu conference, two key concepts attracted the attention of the participants. First, contemporary literary theory and secondly, its trans-cultural travel. "Contemporary" and "contemporarity" are important concepts because people are considering the possibilities to go beyond the post-modern and post-modernism. The introduction of so many different theories into China has contributed to confusion among Chinese scholars. They now wish to return to their own ways of living and artistic practices. Their aim is to find possibilities for focusing on their own practices while continuing to introduce the theories from abroad. Secondly, the matter of the trans-cultural travel of theories is important. During the 20th century, many theories have become influential internationally. Most of them originated from Europe and became internationally influential by way of their  reception and development in the USA. Now, as theories travel to China, it is hoped that their reception and development here can become theoretically significant and fruitful in the future as well.

Jale Erzen & Raffaele Milani (eds.) Nature and the City. Beauty is Taking on a New Form. International Yearbook mof Aesthetics. Volume 17. Sassari: Edzione Edes 2013

Contents

The city, too, is landscape. We can leave it by going into nature exchanging the urban for the rural, but we can also enter the city to live within the architecture and contemplate its forms. Every architectural structure is a landscape and promotes an educational or paedeumatic relationship between the spirit and the environment. Our gaze and our bodies activate a certain way of contemplating that promotes the interchange between the external perception of the physical world and an internal seeing, which is the psychic perception of the visual image. There is a close relationship between the aesthetic experience of the natural environment and that of the urban landscape. In the same way that humankind lives on the earth so, too, it lives in the city.

The theme could be approached from various perspectives such as ‘na­ture/culture’, ‘city as human nature’, ‘ecology and the city’, symbols and metaphors, domesticated nature, nature interiorized, parks and natural en­vironments, and other related issues.

About the Editors

Jale Nejdet Erzen (izmir University), painter and art historian, publications on Ottoman architecture, painting and aesthetics. Vice president of IAA. Founder and long-time president of Turkish Association of Aesthetics, SAN ART. Affi­liations, Middle East Technical University-Ankara and izmir University Izmir Turkey. Recent publications on urban aesthetics, contemporary art.

Raffaele Milani is Professor of Aesthetics and the author of numerous books, including The Ae­sthetic Categories, The Adventure of Landscape and The Faces of Grace. Philoso­phy, Art, and Nature. Director of the Laboratory of Research on the Cities (Institute for Advanced Studies), University of Bologna. Member of the Eu­ropean Commission at the French Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development on: De la connaissance des paysages à l’action paysagère.

 

The Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology aims to encourage and promote research in aesthetics that draws inspiration from the phenomenological tradition as broadly understood, where “phenomenology” is inclusive of, but goes beyond the limits of, intellectual practices associated with the tradition and its well-known representative thinkers.  Unique in the English speaking world, the journal welcomes scholarly articles written in a phenomenological vein as well as analyses of aesthetic phenomena by researchers working on phenomenology within analytic philosophy.  

The field of the Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology is further defined by its close connections with the arts and culture, including the reality of human experience and its environment. Besides philosophical rigor, the journal puts emphasis on both creativity of ideas and precision of language. It provides a platform for new innovative ideas crossing the boundaries of both philosophical traditions and traditionally accepted fields of research in aesthetics.

See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/journal/journal-of-aesthetics-and-phenomenology/#sthash.uYYkvy29.dpuf

UnderConstructionThe IAA website is currently under construction. As a result of the construction some links are temporary not functional. The full content will appear again soon.

My apologies for the inconvenience,

Jos de Mul (web editor)

Jos de Mul and Renée van de Vall (eds.) Gimme Shelter: Global Discourses in Aesthetics. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 15. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2013

Contents

Gimme Shelter. Global discourses in aesthetics contains a series of reflections on the impact of globalization on the arts and the aesthetic reflection on the arts. The authors – fifteen distinguished  aestheticians from all over the world -   discuss a variety of aesthetic questions brought forth by the aforementioned process of globalization. How do artistic practices and aesthetic experiences change in response to these developments? How should we articulate these changes on the theoretical level? When reflections on the significance of art and aesthetic experiences can no longer pretend to be universal, is it still possible to lay claim to  a wider validity than merely that of one’s own particular culture? What type of vocabulary allows for mutual – dialogical or even polylogical – exchanges and understandings when different traditions meet, without obliterating local differences? Is there a possibility for a creative re-description of globalization? And is there a meaning of ‘the global’ that cannot be reduced to universalism and unification? Can we seek shelter in a legitimate way?

About the editors

Jos de Mul  is professor of Man and Culture at Erasmus University Rotterdam. He has also taught at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and Fudan Univer- sity (Shanghai), and has been visiting fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. From 2007 until 2010 he was the President of the International Associa- tion of Aesthetics. His work is on the interface of philosophical anthropology (and its history), aesthetics, and philosophy of technology. English publications include: Romantic Desire in (Post)Modern Art and Philosophy (State University of New York Press, 1999), The Tragedy of Finitude. Dilthey’s Hermeneutics of Life (Yale Univer- sity Press, 2004), Cyberspace Odyssey. Towards a Virtual Ontology and Anthropology (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010), and Destiny Domesticated. The Rebirth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Technology (State University of New York Press, 2013). His work has been translated in more than a dozen languages. An extended CV and publication list is available at www.demul.nl.

Renée van de Vall  is professor in Art and Media at Maastricht University where she is chair of the Department of Arts & Literature. She has been president of the Dutch Association for Aesthetics (2002-2006) and is currently Dutch delegate in the Executive Committee of the IAA. Her research interests are philosophical aesthetics and the phenomenology of contemporary visual art and spectatorship. She currently leads an interdisciplinary research project on the theory and ethics of the conservation of contemporary art. Some recent publications are At the Edges of Vision. A Phenomenological Aesthetics of Contemporary Spectatorship (2008); ‘A Penny For Your Thoughts. Brain-scans and the Mediation of Subjective Embodi- ment’ in R. van de Vall & R. Zwijnenberg (eds.) The Body Within: Art, Medicine and Visualisation (2009); and ‘Towards a Theory and Ethics for the Conservation of Contemporary Art’ in Art d’aujourd’hui – patrimoine de demain. Conservation et restauration des oeuvres contemporaines. (2009).