Previous congresses of the IAA

Previous congresses of the IAA

Congresses

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By Jos de Mul

         I     Berlin (Germany), 1913        II     Paris (France), 1937       III     Venice (Italy), 1956       IV    Athens (Greece), 1960       …

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Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action

Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action

Yearbooks

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By Zoltan

Volume 18. Krystyna Wilkoszewska (ed.). Aesthetics in Action. International Yearbook of Aesthetics. Volume 18. 2014   Content   The 18th…

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ICA 2019 – Belgrade, Serbia, 22-26 July 2019

ICA 2019 – Belgrade, Serbia, 22-26 July 2019

News

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By Zoltan

ANNOUNCEMENT   The 21th International Congress of Aesthetics 2019 (ICA 2019) will be held in Belgrade, Serbia, from July 22…

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Congresses

Congresses (12)

Announcement from the Organising Committee of ICA Seoul 2016

 

Due to numerous requests to extend the deadline of early registration and abstract submission, the Organising Committee of 2016 ICA Seoul is pleased to announce that we will continue to accept abstract submissions until April 15, 2016. Until then, early registration fee will be applied. Those who wish to modify their abstract contents may do so until April 15 as well.

Thank you for your interest and participation.

 

Young Scholar Awards: Call for Papers

 

The International Association of Aesthetics cordially invites Ph.D. candidate students to apply for Young Scholar Awards for the 20th International Congress of Aesthetics. The 20th ICA will be held at Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, July 24-29, 2016.

 

The IAA will select 10 papers and will award 500 USD to each winner. The Young Scholar Awardees will be honored at the Congress.

 

The deadline for paper submissions is May 20, 2016, and the awards will be announced by the end of May. The length of a paper should be 8-10 double-spaced 12 pt-font pages for 20-minute presentation. Papers over length will be disqualified from consideration.

 

Applicants should register for the Congress by March 1, 2016, to avoid the late registration penalty. For a regular registration, the applicant only has to submit his/her abstract. Should the applicant receive the award, the registration fee will be refunded.

 

In the case that the applicant is not awarded and s/he cannot attend the Congress, the registration fee will be refunded, provided the applicant declares this to the organizers no later than June 15, 2016. No refunds will be granted for withdrawals after this date.

 

Please send the papers to Young Scholar Awards, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For registration and further details about the conference, please see http://www.ica2016.org/

 

Gao Jianping   President of IAA,

Tyrus Miller   Secretary General

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Perspectives on Food Aesthetics

The Department of Culture Studies at the University of Wroclaw, University of Social Science and Humanities, and Northern Arizona University invite proposals for papers to be presented at a 3-day conference, June 17-19, 2016

Location: University of Wroclaw (Wroclaw Poland)

 

A specific trend in modern visual arts involves artists enthusiastically embracing food as an artistic medium. The depiction of food in the arts is not new. Recently, however, a distinct turn has taken place, with food products becoming not only a theme in art but also the raw material of art. Since the 1930’s, consumption of food and drink has been used both to expand the scope of arts and to comment critically on contemporary culture, raising issues of consumption, ecology, globalization, hospitality, gender, politics, etc.  The work of many artists challenges traditional assumptions a about a sharp art/life division as well as challenging traditional aesthetic norms. There are thus artists who become cooks, but also cooks who see themselves as artists. A prime example of this latter is Ferran Adrià, founder of molecular cuisine, whom the art world has embraced as its own. In the face of these tendencies, this conference will be examining (a) the extent to which it is possible to merge the two realms; (b) what sorts of overlapping possibilities exist between artists and cooks; and (c) what all this might mean for a revised understanding of the “aesthetic.”  

This conference will explore the ways in which the art world meets gastronomic culture; it will analyze the objectives of food centered artistic practices and the aesthetic discourse on the question of the artistic validity of food and cooking.

 

Conference papers should address one of the following two domains:

- discussion of aesthetic value of food

- art works and artistic practices focusing on food

 

Keynote speaker:

Richard Shusterman (The Center for Body, Mind, and Culture, Florida Atlantic University)

 

Conference Committee:

Raymond Boisvert (Siena College, NY)

Miroslaw Kocur (University of Wroclaw)

Carolyn Korsmeyer (University at Buffalo, SUNY)

Dorota Monkiewicz (MWW Wroclaw Contemporary Museum)

Richard Shusterman (Florida Atlantic University)

Krystyna Wilkoszewska (Jagiellonian University)

Dorota Wolska (University of Wroclaw)

 

A selection of the best seminar papers will be considered, after an external double blind review process, for publication in a volume.

Abstracts of 250 words, and a current CV, should be sent electronically as attachments, no later than February 15, 2016, to Dorota Koczanowicz at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Please direct conference inquiries to the same address.

Prospective speakers will be notified by March, 2016.

Conference fee: 100 , 70 (doctoral students)

 

 

Organizers:

Dorota Koczanowicz (University of Wroclaw) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Russell Pryba (Northern Arizona University) This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

CALL FOR PROPOSAL 2016

IDENTIFYING THE POLITICAL

Conceptual Analysis: Rhetoric, Poetics and Populist Talk in Contemporary Politics

Appearances of the Political 1/6

Winter Symposium: February 22-23, 2016, University of Latvia (Main Building, Rai?a bulv?ris 19) in collaboration with University of Latvia

 

Invitation

The Nordic Summer University (NSU) study group Appearances of the Political announces a CFP for its winter symposium. The first session of the group will be organized in cooperation with Institute of Literature, Folklore and Art and Faculty of Theology, the Latvian University in Riga, Latvia.

The topic, Identifying the Political, will address the verbal play and its connection to physical presences of today’s political reality and approach it from the point of view of social, artistic, aesthetic and cultural analysis.

By focusing on the conceptual base of the appearances of the political we wish to articulate clearly the artistic, aesthetic and cultural forces underlying today’s political thinking. We also want to inaugurate a debate on the role of cultural approaches in political analysis. To really discuss the political we need to establish a deeper understanding of the key concepts and their cultural extensions before elaborating on other forms of investigating them.

This could, for example, be related to the impact of concepts like migration / refugee. What cultural significance do these (or any similar politically explosive) concepts anchor to?

We wish to break new paths in connecting the cultural humanities and the political sciences. This symposium thus invites the participants to explore bravely new ways of studying the issue. We believe that experimentation is crucial for rethinking the political.

Our partner in the winter session 2016 is the University of Latvia in Riga and we collaborate closely with Pauls Daija and the Institute of Literature, Folklore and Art.

About the Study Group

The intention of Appearances of the Political is to create a platform for future collaborations and applications, and to exchange knowledge and share common interest. It is important for the group to consult a variety of fields as broad as possible including political theory, philosophy, communication, social sciences and cultural studies, and we hope that scholars from all areas of interest would join us.

Participating in this first meeting of the group does not imply any obligation for participating in future meetings. We hope, however, that participants will be involved in building a strong community on this topic for future activities reflecting the diversity of interests in the community. Future seminars will focus on History, Material Culture, Activism, Political Art and Aesthetics in the Everyday, and Communication. The list of sites for the study circle is planned to be, among more, of the following order: Riga, Orivesi (NSU Summer Session), Bratislava, St. Petersburg and Copenhagen. Changes might appear as well as additions. We are open to any propositions concerning collaboration, partners and sites.

We invite proposals for presentations addressing different problems relating to this call. We hope that academicians, artists, students, third sector agents and intellectuals would participate. Please don’t hesitate to ask any questions from the coordinators!

Please bookmark the study circle on NSU’s webpage http://nordic.university/study-circles/2-appearances-of-the-political/

and the blog of the study circle: http://appearancesofthepolitical.blogspot.com

 

Format of the presentation

Format of presentation can be either:
15 minutes presentation + 15 minutes discussion
or
30 minutes presentation + 10 minutes discussion.

Please indicate your wish in the abstract!

We encourage you to give an oral presentation, i.e. no dry reading of a paper or reading from texts on power points (use power points for pictures, illustration of similar material). What matters is the content and what you have to say, not the rhetorical performance. Any form of experimental presentation is very much welcomed.

To submit a proposal please send via email to the coordinators:

Max Ryynänen: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Carsten Friberg: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  1. A written proposal (300-500 words) with a title and descriptive subtitle. This text should include your presentation proposal, its format its duration, facilities you need (I.e. technical equipment)
  2. If you wish to participate without giving a presentation, please write a short (200 words) description of yourself.

 

The deadline to submit proposals is November 30, 2015.  The preliminary program will be announced on December 15, 2015 on www.nordic.university where you can also find more information about NSU and sign up for the newsletter.

The applications will be viewed ASAP. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance no later than December 15.

Later submission is possible but we will prioritize early submissions.

 

Registration and fee

Students, unemployed and freelancers: 30 €

Baltic students: 10 €

Those associated with institutions:  50 €

We will use the fees to cover some food and other expenses for the participants.

Participants should apply to their institutions, Art Councils, local foundations or sponsors to have their travel cost covered.

 

 

Official website for the CFP: http://nordic.university/study-circles/2-appearances-of-the-political/call-for-proposal-winter-2016-circle-2/

Short presentation of the circle: http://nordic.university/study-circles/2-appearances-of-the-political/

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Beautiful Game: The Poetics and Aesthetics of Soccer in Transnational Perspective

University of Basel

June 30-July 2, 2016

 

Confirmed Speakers:

Simon Critchley (New School for Social Research)

Eva Lavric (University of Innsbruck)

Emily Ryall (University of Gloucestershire)

 

This conference, scheduled to take place during the 2016 European Championship and hosted by the University of Basel’s Department of English, takes up soccer with a special focus on its poetics and aesthetics. The conference particularly seeks to scrutinize the poetics and aesthetics of the game in light of comparative as well as transnational, transcontinental, and global perspectives. In doing so, it aims to shed light on the poetics and aesthetics of all aspects of soccer, from the actual game to fan chants and choreographies, from representations in the arts to the aesthetics of media coverage, from the poetics of live commentary to institutional image cultivation (MLS, FIFA, UEFA, etc.), from aspects of design (jerseys, balls) to recent developments in stadium architecture. Given this range and diversity of the forms in which the poetics and aesthetics of soccer manifest themselves, the conference by necessity is interdisciplinary in nature, with possible contributions coming from fields such as literary and cultural studies, philosophy, linguistics, visual studies and the arts, design, and architecture to name but a few.

 

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

• the poetics and aesthetics of the game

• “skill,” “creativity,” “intuition,” and “style” in soccer

• soccer and the notions of the beautiful and the sublime

• fan chants

• fan choreographies

• Ultra aesthetics

• the aesthetics (and politics) of institutional image cultivation via the staging of events such as opening ceremonies, fixture draws, player award ceremonies, etc.

• languages of/in soccer

• the poetics and rhetoric of soccer live commentary

• the poetics, rhetoric, and aesthetics of soccer media coverage

• representations of soccer in the arts (including literature and film)

• the aesthetics of stadium architecture

• design in soccer: jerseys, balls, gear, club emblems, etc.

 

In addition to academic talks, the conference will also include an art event, exhibiting some of the original art that is the basis for tschuttiheftli’s sticker collection they create for every World Cup and European Championship (http://www.tschuttiheft.li/).

 

Please send your 300-word abstracts and 100-word bios to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline for submissions is December 14, 2015. The conference organizers plan to publish a collection of essays based on selected contributions to the conference.

 

Conference Organizers:

Dr. phil. des. Ridvan Askin and Dr. Catherine Diederich, Department of English, University of Basel, Nadelberg 6, CH-4051 Basel

 

 

European Society for Aesthetics Conference 2016

Barcelona (Spain) 8 – 10 June 2016

 

Submission deadline: 15th of January 2016

 

The European Society for Aesthetics would like to invite you to submit a paper for presentation at the ESA Conference 2016. The conference will be co-organised by the ESA, the Department of Philosophy of the Autonomous University of Barcelona and the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Barcelona. 

 

Confirmed Keynote speakers:     

 

ï Christoph Menke (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Frankurt)

ï Elisabeth Schellekens (Uppsala Universitet)

ï Lev Kreft (University of Ljubljana)

 

We are inviting papers from all traditions and on any topic in philosophical aesthetics, and both systematic and historical presentations are acceptable. 

 

We encourage the presentation of submissions in English, but submissions in other major European languages will be considered equally. For each talk, there will be time for a 25-minute presentation, with about another 20 minutes designated for discussion. All accepted papers would be eligible for publication in the proceedings of the ESA. (http://proceedings.eurosa.org)

  

 

Submissions must be long abstracts, between 800 and 1.200 words in length, presenting not only the main ideas and claims of the paper, but also the chief considerations and arguments in favour of them. Please, notice that full paper submissions will not be accepted and submissions are limited to one per person.

 

Please use the PDF-file format for submission and render your text completely anonymous, allowing for blind refereeing. To submit your long abstract, please use the EasyChair online submission system (first-time users will be asked to register with EasyChair). 

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=esa2016

We also encourage all submitters to sign up as members of the ESA (which is free): http://www.eurosa.org/

 

The deadline for submissions of papers is the 15th of January 2016, and we aim to inform you about the result of our selection process by mid February 2016.  

 

 

Further information about the conference will soon be available on ESA website. Please send all your questions to the conference organizers: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

The 20th International Congress of Aesthetics

“Aesthetics and Mass Culture”

24-29 July 2016 (Sunday-Friday)

Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

 

 

Call for Papers

 

ICA 2016 organizing committee invites all interested individuals to submit the abstract of a paper for 20-minute presentation. There will be 5-minute Q&A after presentation.

 

• Abstract submission deadline: March 1, 2016

• Paper submission deadline: June 30, 2016

• How to submit: On-line submission at www.ica2016.org

 

 

Topics

1. Issues of Art Theories in the Era of Mass Culture

2. New Media, Design and Aesthetics

3. Aesthetics of Body and Sports

4. Reflections on the History of Aesthetics

5. Values of Art: Cognitive, Moral and Political

6. Scientific Perspectives on Aesthetics

7. Imagination and Emotion

8. Aesthetics of Environment and Ecology

9. Aesthetics and Theories of Individual Artistic Genres

10. Aesthetics and Art Theories in Asian Traditions

 

Registration

 

All participants are requested to register via on-line system. Please visit our

website in order to proceed your registration. (www.ica2016.org)

Registration fee:

Regular   USD 300 (by March 1, 2016)          USD 350 (late and on-site)

Student*  USD 150 (by March 1, 2016)           USD 200 (late and on-site)

*A copy of “STUDENT ID” will be needed.

 

Organizing Committee

 

- President of the Organizing Committee of ICA2016

Prof. Chong-hwan Oh (Seoul National University)

- President of the Korean Society of Aesthetics

Prof. Joosik Min (Youngnam University)

- Secretary General of ICA2016

Prof. Haewan Lee (Seoul National University)

 

 

ICA 2016 Secretariat

 

Tel. +82-2-880-6255, Fax. +82-2-877-6340

E-mail. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Department of Aesthetics, College of Humanities, Seoul National University,

Gwanakno1, Gwanakgu, Seoul, 151-745, South Korea

For more information, visit our website: www.ica2016.org

President’s Greetings

 

On behalf of the members of the Korean Society for Aesthetics, I am greatly honored to hold the 20th International Congress for Aesthetics in Seoul, the capital of the Republic of Korea, under the auspices of the International Association for Aesthetics (L’Association Internationale d’Esthétique). The Congress will be held on the campus of Seoul National University from the 24th (Sunday) to the 29th (Friday) of July, 2016. SNU is the most prestigious university in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and home to the only Department of Aesthetics in the country.

  The Korean Society of Aesthetics, the most authoritative nationwide society in the field, was established in September, 1968, being the first association for aesthetics in the Republic of Korea. With a 47-year tradition, the now more than 300 members of the KSA are actively engaged in a broad range of aesthetic subjects across the Asian, Analytic, and European traditions, including theories of painting, the aesthetics of music and film, and sociological aesthetics. Our members also play major roles in the various artistic and cultural fields in Korea. Many members of the KSA earned their Ph. D. degrees abroad, mainly from the USA, Germany, and France in the West, and China and Japan in the East. As a result, the academic climate of the KSA is comprehensive and well-informed, and the Society is very well-equipped to deal with aesthetics in an international context. With such broad backgrounds, we are confident in our ability to host a very successful Seoul ICA.

The theme of the Seoul Congress is “Aesthetics and Mass Culture.” The Congress will focus on the various aesthetic aspects of mass culture, which, due to the rapid development of information technology, has become one of the most prominent of contemporary cultural phenomena. We are all familiar with the idea of globalization and with developments in information technology. We have been told that, thanks to the internet and other modes of information technology, there are a few, if any, places isolated from the rest of the world today. The importance of globalization, one of whose symptoms is the overwhelming flow of information, is not just that we can learn more about other countries, other people, and other cultures, but also that we become more likely to be influenced by other cultures, especially their ways of life. To try to understand and, in some cases, to accept other cultures and life styles often results in a change of one’s own view of life, even one’s own view of the world, which also includes one’s conception of the arts and sensibilities to the aesthetic. But the revolution of information technology also raises the philosophical or aesthetic issue of mass art and mass culture, which, we think, deserves serious discussion. We hope that the Congress will achieve many fruitful results from the many urgent aesthetic questions arising as a result of these phenomena.

In addition to these questions, the Seoul Congress, as with all other Congresses, will be open to every traditional subject of aesthetics and we welcome papers and panel proposals devoted to all fields of aesthetics. The Congress will consist of several panels and round tables, along with dozens of sessions, including sessions for individual artistic genres. The Organizing Committee will choose the topics for some events, but the rest will be open to the general members of the IAA.

It is my promise that we will devote all our efforts to the success of the Seoul Congress. In the name of all the members of the Korean Society for Aesthetics, I hope to see you all in Korea next summer.

 

 Prof. Chong-hwan Oh

(President of the Organizing Committee for 2016 ICA,

Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

Editors Note: As we look forward to upcoming events in Belgrade Serbia, June 2015, and the next International Congress of Aesthetics to be held in Seoul, Korea, Summer 2016, it may be informative to review the conference report of the organizing committee of the centennial Congress entitled Aesthetics in Action that was held in Krakow, Poland last summer. This report was inadvertently omitted from IAA Newsletter #43 published in January 2014 and its belated inclusion here reminds us of the professionalism required to plan and execute our association’s related meetings. Sebastian Stankiewicz and Lilianna Bieszczad co-authored this Organizers Report.

After meetings in Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro, Ankara, and Beijing,  the International Congress of Aesthetics (ICA) returned to Europe for the first time in 21st century. Krakow, Poland was the site of the centennial Congress (19. ICA 2013) and its theme, Aesthetics in Action, emphasized the dynamic changes in the discipline of aesthetics.

The Congress was organized by Polish Society of Aesthetics, Jagiellonian University, and International Association for Aesthetics. Organizing an international event of this stature required the cooperation not only of Poland’s aesthetic circles and academic communities but also government institutions including the Ministry of the Culture and National Heritage of Republic of Poland, the Ministry of the Science and High Education Republic of Poland, and the Office of the Mayor of Krakow, Jacek Majchrowski. The Honorary Committee included professors representing all of Poland’s aesthetic communities: Grzegorz Dziamski, Bohdan Dziemidok, Maria Go?aszewska, Leszek Koczanowicz, Teresa Kostyrko, Alicja Kuczy?ska, Iwona Lorenc, Teresa P?kala, Ewa Rewers, Piotr J. Przybysz, Tadeusz Szko?ut, Grzegorz Sztabi?ski, Irena Wojnar, and Anna Zeidler-Janiszewsk?. The Organizing Committee, under direction of Prof. Krystyna Wilkoszewska, directly participated in the preparations of all the many and varied the Congress events included: Rafa? Delekta (Academy of Music in Krakow), Antoni Porczak (Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow), Krzysztof Lenartowicz (Tadeusz Ko?ciuszko Krakow University of Technology), Alicja Panasiewicz (Pedagogical University of Krakow), Stanis?aw Hry? (Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University), and from the primary host institution Jagiellonian University, Jaros?aw Górniak, Micha? Bohun, Lilianna Bieszczad, Jakub Petri, Sebastian Stankiewicz and Ewa Chudoba.

International and intercultural atmosphere of the Congress assured the number of abstract submissions received would be high. There were over 500 submissions from 56 countries. Congress attendance was 460 which included aestheticians who presented their papers as well as participated in the Congress events.

The Opening Ceremony on June 22,2013 was held in the Auditorium Maximum of the Jagiellonian University. Guest and participants were welcome by the organizers and representatives of cooperating institutions: Rector of the Jagiellonian University Prof. Wojciech Nowak, President of the IAA Curtis L. Carter, President-Elect Prof. Gao Jianping, Dean of the Department of Philosophy of Jagiellonian University, Prof. Jaros?aw Górniak, President of the Polish Society of Aesthetics Prof. Krystyna Wilkoszewska, and Vice-Mayor of Krakow, Magdalena Sroka, s well as Vice-Rectors of Jagiellonian University, Prof. S. Kistryn and Prof. A. Mania, and members of the Honorary Committee. Rector of Jagiellonian University announced the Congress to be open, was followed by the Presidential Lecture of Curtis L. Carter entitled, Aesthetics and the Arts in Action. This theme continued in round table discussion: Past and Future of the ICAs – a Hundred Years. In the afternoon, the ceremony continued in the Krakow Philharmonic Hall, starting with Arnold Berleant’s plenary panel and culminating with the Inaugural Concert performed by Beethoven Academy Orchestra conducted by Jacek Kaspszyk. During the concert there were presented two compositions arranged in one work: Aisthesis Symphony (2013) by Karol Nepelski and Ignacy Feliks Dobrzy?ski’s Overture to the opera Monbar (1838). The Opening Ceremony concluded with reception in Krakow City Hall, Wielopolski Palace, where participants were greeted by Jacek Majchrowski, Mayor of Krakow. Jacek Majchrowski and Curtis L. Carter responded as representatives of the Congress.

The Organizing Committee formed several types of sessions including two new kinds of sessions: first innovation were plenary panels, organized by invited by the Committee scientists and secondly, panel sessions, which were submitted by participants. In addition, participants presented papers in sessions and there were numerous other round-table discussions as well as poster sessions. The most popular plenary panels highlighted the new important directions in the development of aesthetics. These panels were Arnold Berleant’s Aesthetic Engagement , Wolfgang Welsch’s Aesthetics Beyond Aesthetics, Richard Shusterman’s Somaesthetics, and Aleš Erjavec’s Aesthetics and Politics.

Other sessions and round-table discussions included: Past and Future of the ICAs – a Hundred Years, with chair: Aleš Erjavec (Slovenia) with Curtis L. Carter (USA), Gao Jianping (China), Miško Šuvakovi? (Serbia), Bohdan Dziemidok (Poland), Chong-hwan Oh (Korea), Arnold Berleant (USA), Zsolt Batori (Hungary). The second round-table discussion, Aesthetics in 20th Century Poland, included Polish representatives Zofia Rosi?ska and Krystyna Wilkoszewska, with participants from other countries including: Zdenka Kalnicka (Czech Republic), Gao Jianping (China) and Joseph Margolis (USA). The last discussion was accompanied by a publication of a great interest of Congress participants, presenting achievements of Polish aesthetics, 20th Century Aesthetics in Poland, Edited by Krystyna Wilkoszewska.

Particular interest attracted panel sessions. Among 20 submitted, six panels were connected in pairs creating bigger theme units: interpretation panels (organized by Joseph Margolis and Noel Carroll, both USA); bio-art panels (organized by Polona Tratnik, Slovenia and Ingeborg Reichle, Germany); changes in culture and arts (Marcin Rychter, Poland, and Kenneth Stikkers, USA). Other sessions and their organizers included: Global Aesthetics and Chinese Aesthetics (Eva Wah Man, Hong Kong); Applied Social Art: The Potential of Art and Criticism after March 11, 2011 (Akiko Kasuya, Japan); Aesthetic Accounts on Japanese Pop-culture (Hisashi Muroi, Japan); The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution (Stephan Davies, Australia, Jerzy Luty, Poland); Aesthetics and Landscape (Raffaele Milani, Italy, Yuko Nakama, Japan); Spatial Perception and Aesthetics of Court and Garden (Jeongil Seo, Korea); Cyberaesthetics – the Phenomena of Electronic Art (Michal Ostrowicki, Poland); Art in Action (Maja Piotrowska-Tryzno, Poland); Participatory Art: Ethics and Politics (Michael Kelly, USA); Artification (Yrj? Sep?nmaa, Finland); The Perfomativity of Images in the Social Context (Aleksandra ?ukaszewicz-Alcaraz, Poland); Between Loss and Repetition. Creativity as Response to Death as the Negative Muse (Bogna J. Obidzinska, Poland); Polish Music and Modernity (Teresa Ma?ecka, Poland); Rediscovering Susanne Langer’s Relevance for Contemporary Aesthetics and Theory of Art (Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin, Great Britain).

Other participants presented their papers ordered in ten diverse topics: Aesthetics – Visions and RevisionsChanges in Art – Past and PresentAesthetics in Practice – the Aesthetic Factor in Religion, Ethics, Education, Politics, Law, Economy, Trade, Fashion, Sports, Everyday Life etc.Aesthetics and Nature: Evolutionism, Ecology, Posthumanism…Body Aesthetics – Soma and SensesArt and ScienceTechnologies and Bio-technologies in Aesthetics and ArtArchitecture and Urban Space; Cultural and Intercultural Studies in AestheticsThe Sphere of Transition – Transections, Transformations, Transfigurations in Culture, Aesthetics and the Arts.

According to the number of submissions, it can be pointed out that the dominant interests were within the contemporary field of aesthetics. The largest number of submissions were in the theme of Vision and Revision and Aestetics in Practice (100 and 64 respectively). There was also great interest in new phenomena in the arts, such as bio-art. All of the  presentations were performed simultaneously in nine areas of the Auditorium Maximum, and also – during two Congress days – in Collegium Maius of Jagiellonian University, and in the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery of Contemporary Art.

ART IN ACTION: The Krakow Congress was held under the banner of Aesthetics in Action, supplemented by the Organizing Committee in artistic part of the Congress, by analogical phrase Art in Action. The last slogan marked almost all artistic events organized during the Congress. The two most important events were to be: Inaugural Concert, which was held in Opening Day in the Krakow Philharmonic Hall and the projection of Krzysztof Wodiczko’s War Veterans Projection held in the night at the Main Market. During the Inaugural Concert, prepared by the Academy of Music in Krakow, City Hall Office, and Philharmonic Hall, there have been heard a composition of a young composer Karol Nepelski’s Aisthetic Symphony (2013) put together with Ignacy Dobrzy?ski’s Overture to the opera Monbar (1838). The works have not been performed one after the one, but arranged by Nepelski in one piece, and supplemented by elements of performance art. The word “aesthesis” and “aesthetics” were encoded in melodics and harmonics of the composition. The work have been performed by Beethoven Academy Orchestra conducted by Jacek Kaspszyk,. 

The second event initiated by the Organizing Committee, have been realized, thanks to the support of the City Hall Office, by team of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow (MOCAK). The Wodiczko’s projection consisted of white words display on the wall of the City Hall Tower, armored car as a source of the displayed images and sounds effects, and the very sound effects. Words displayed on tower wall were extracts from statements of war veterans and members of their families. All statements were played simultaneously as an audible material supplemented by light flashes and sounds of explosions or gunshots. It should be added, that next day after projection, Wodiczko presented his lecture concerning more theoretical issues.

Another artistic event very popular among Congress participants and Krakow citizens and tourists, was an exhibition of Eduardo Kac Lagoglyphs in Bunkier Sztuki Gallery of Contemporary Art. The theoretical issues were undertaken by the artist and Wolfgang Welsch on two occasions; the first time during a meeting in Bunkier Sztuki Gallery mediated by its director, Piotr Cyprya?ski, and secondly, in an entirely academic environment of a plenary panel held in Auditorium Maximum. The exhibition in Bunkier Sztuki Kac developed some ideas derived from his work of the transgenic rabbit, centered around visual and poetic dimensions of a language presenting his graphic and multimedia works. Within media works the artist employed the Google Earth application and, next to ready-made graphic works, he decided to make a site specific mural for the occasion.

There were also other artistic events in the building of Auditorium Maximum available for Congress participants. Mostly there have been events marked in their structure by such notions like interaction, activity, being in process. One of such event was an audio-visual installation Behind the Wall by Marek Cho?oniewski, artist connected with two Krakow universities: the Academy of Music in Krakow and Academy of Fine Arts. The installation have been a most noticeable artistic action, because it was performed in a space of the Auditorium Maximum underground where met participants during lunch, coffee breaks, and a the Congress reception. Other artistic events were performed by masters and their students of two universities: the Department of Arts of Pedagogical University of Krakow and Academy of Arts in Szczecin. Events organized by the former were: an exhibition of bio-art Plantomorphs, held partly in medial form in the Auditorium and partly concerning live forms on the roof of the main building of the Pedagogical University (Laboratorium Gallery); and also Garage Sale organized by students from the Roombook group, who realized an idea of artistic interventions taken upon objects exchanged with people visiting their workshop in the Auditorium underground. Instead Academy of Arts events consisted of: students’ films screening on TV monitors in halls of the Auditorium, an exhibition of sculptures made as copies of objects depicted on the photos above them, an action Rest for Hours with fully equipped tent providing a rest space for participants of the Congress, and finally, an installation activated in an elevator made by artist ?ukasz Sk?pski, whose title Music from Trash meant music taken from the artist’s trash folder on his computer. Actions of both universities were supervised by curators: Prof. Halina Cader-Paw?owska, from the Pedagogical University, Prof. ?ukasz Sk?pski and Aleksandra ?ukaszewicz-Alcaraz, PhD, from the Academy of Arts in Szczecin.

INSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION: The 19. ICA Krakow 2013 became a great challenge for both Polish communities, academic and cultural. According to the tradition of ICAs, Congress of Aesthetics have always been an opportunity to present an artistic and cultural heritage of the country which organized the event. In fulfilling this tradition the Organizing Committee engaged all Polish aesthetic academic communities and both the scientific and cultural institutions of the city of Krakow. Thanks to the organizers efforts, the Congress received also very broad support from institutions of the state, as well as, from local authorities. In particular, the most fruitful cooperation was with the office of the Mayor of Krakow and Krakow City Hall. The Organizing Committee was given a support in producing the two most important artistic events: the Inaugural Concert with participation of the Beethoven Academy Orchestra conducted by Jacek Kaspszyk in the Krakow Philharmonic Hall and Krzysztof Wodiczko’s War Veteran Projection. Moreover, Jacek Majchrowski, the Mayor of Krakow, invited the Congress participants for the reception held in Krakow City Hall, the Wielopolski Palace, and the Mayor Office made possible promotion of the Congress among citizens of Krakow and great number of tourists, printing posters of the centennial conference and giving them public space. Film clips announcing the conference event were seen on the television monitors included on city-wide trams and buses.

The organizers engaged many of Krakow’s scientific and cultural institutions thus fulfilling all organizers intentions to make the Congress fully representative of Poland’s and Krakow’s aesthetic, scientific, and cultural communities. One result of this cooperation was the publication, 20th Century Aesthetics in Poland, edited by Krystyna Wilkoszewska. It has received broad interest from all the participants of the Congress.

Among universities involved in cooperation with the Organizing Committee, before others it should be underlined the Academy of Music in Krakow and its very important contribution to the organization of the Inaugural Concert and a plenary panel held in the Philharmonic Hall. Other universities participation in the organization of the Congress include: Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University and the Dean of the Department of Architecture and Arts Prof. Stanis?aw Hry? who announced a student contest for Congress visual identification (won a student of painting, Joanna Krzempek), the Department of Arts of the Pedagogical University of Krakow, and also the Academy of Arts in Szczecin. The last two participated mainly in the organization of artistic events.

Among Krakow cultural institutions very important role played the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow (MOCAK) with its director, Masza Potocka, who took the care of the practical production of Wodiczko’s projection, and who also invited Congress participants for cocktail party in the museum building and to visit all open exhibitions.

Equally important role played the Bunkier Sztuki Gallery of Contemporary Art with its director Piotr Cyprya?ski. The result of the cooperation have been the exhibition Lagoglyphs by Eduardo Kac, held during the Congress week, and also the meeting with Wolfgang Welsh and the artist. There were also held some of the scientific sessions of the Congress, making Bunkier Sztuki one of the three scientific spots of the Congress, among Auditorium Maximum and the oldest Jagiellonian University building of Collegium Maius.

In addition to Congress participants having the opportunity to visit Krakow’s near-by historical sites, the Museum of the Japan Arts and Technology also took a part organizing an afternoon reception and guided tour of the museum.

Other Krakow cultural institutions and museums opening their institutions to Congress participants included Director Zofia Go?ubiew invitation to the National Museum in Krakow and Director Micha? Niezabitowski invitation to see the Undergrounds of the Main Market which is part of the Historical Museum of City of Krakow.

The Organizing Committee of the 19. ICA 2013 Krakow hopes that the Congress contributed to strengthening the connection among all the aesthetic communities from around the world, to further the exchange of ideas among young and experienced scholars and also to increase our mutual academic and professional contacts with the hope that this connection will enhance cooperation among individuals and institutions.

Reporter: Michael Ranta

Website ICA 18

Pictures ICA 18 © Michael Ranta

For about one century now, the international association of aesthetics has arranged19 congresses all over the world, in Europe, Asia, and North and South Americas. The first congress took place in Berlin in 1913, the second one in Paris in 1937, while– interrupted by the Second World War and its aftermath- the following ones were held from 1956 onwards with four-year intervals.[1]  These congresses were initiatedby the Comité International d'Esthétique consisting of prominent, though self-appointed scholars within the field of aesthetics, such as Harold Osborne, Thomas Munro, Etienne Souriau and many others. However, in 1988, the International Association for Aesthetics (IAA) was established, having a formal constitution which included membership for national societies and individual scholars and specified election procedures for IAA’s officers and its executive committee.[2] Under the auspices of the IAA most of the congresses afterwards took place with three-year intervals – in Madrid (1992), Lahti, Finland (1995), Ljubljana, Slovenia (1998), Tokyo (2001), Rio de Janeiro (2003), and in Ankara (2007).

The most recent congress was held 9th to 13th August at Peking University in Beijing, China, organized by the IAA together with the university and Beijing Municipal Education Commission.[3] Whereas the congress in Ankara had about 400 participants, as many as 1000 active participants attended the five-day congress in Beijing, about 400 of them stemming from China itself (and there were about 200 additional Chinese listeners). The attention and interest which the congress quite obviously received, not least within China, was certainly remarkable, and the fact that Yuan Guiren, the Chinese minister of education, gave one of the opening speeches might also be regarded as quite significant. Peking University, which has one of the best reputations in China (and indeed is ranked as nr. 47 on the QS University Ranking List)[4], and its campus provided an excellent setting for the congress. Numerous shops and restaurants were available, and park and garden areas with lakes invited relaxing strolls. Moreover, the university also hosts several museums, and the architectural setting consists of modern buildings as well as traditional Chinese houses and pagodas. Beijing itself, having more than 20 million inhabitants, can sometimes be densely crowded and busy, so the campus area felt something like an oasis in the middle of this huge city. In general, I experienced the atmosphere on this beautiful campus as very friendly and peaceful. Most of the participants were accommodated in university residential facilities and hotels nearby (at subsidized prices), thus the conference locations were quite easily accessible.

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As for the conference itself, I must admit that I – and, as I heard later, even other delegates - had some initial worries over its practical and organizational realization. The congress website with its call for papers, launched at the end of 2009, was certainly promising. Ten main topics were suggested:

  1. The global and the local: Western and non-Western aesthetics;
  2. The definition of art and the analysis of concepts of art;
  3. Conflicts and interactions between cultural studies and aesthetics;
  4. The relationship between aesthetics and philosophy, ethics, psychology, or anthropology, etc.;
  5. The relationship between aesthetics Aestheticsand forms of art, such as music, painting, sculpture, architecture, calligraphy, movie, and design, etc.;
  6. The relationship between aesthetics and nature/environment/ecology;
  7. The relationship between aesthetics and economy, society, and politics;
  8. Aesthetics and aestheticeducation;
  9. Aesthetics: historical traditions and modernization;
  10. Aesthetics: information technology and the cyberspace

As usual, information about the congress fee (200 USD) as well as instructions for the abstracts and the presentations etc. were included, the latter with a suggested length of 30 minutes, including 10 minutes for discussion. However, the initial website ceased to work after a while, and no connection to it could be made. After about two months this site was replaced by another one, which was much more elaborated, but where some of the function buttons did not work. Moreover, the communication by email to the executive staff proved to be difficult, expected answers were often much delayed, and hotel reservations and payments in advance proved in several cases to be difficult (the latter even impossible), demanding a lot of time-consuming correspondence. So, my initial worries were perhaps understandable - but proved in the end to be unnecessary. The XIIIth Congress of Aesthetics, I would say, turned out to be a great success!

The registration procedure at the beginning of the congress proceeded very smoothly at various locations and with the help of innumerable student volunteers who, in my own experience, usually had very good English skills. Each participant received a strong cloth bag containing a book with all abstracts (the size of a phone book!), a set of errata and corrections, a beautifully designed booklet about Chinese aesthetics, information about artistic events, and free lunch/dinner vouchers for all congress days. The enthusiastic and responsive assistance of the volunteers here was outstanding, as well as at the other locations, such as lunch/dinner places, during the cultural events, and at the congress venues in general, and contributed to a large extent to the friendly atmosphere during the congress! Their efforts undoubtedly deserve respect and much gratitude!

One of the larger university buildings functioned as the main venue for the presentations, thus it was quite easy to get from one session to another without any noteworthy delay. The session rooms were bright, modern and functional, with up-to-date technical equipment. The various presentations were, as usual, structured as plenary or panel sessions and (more or less coherent) thematic sections, with a great variety of topics, certainly doing justice to the congress headline “Diversities in Aesthetics”. These included, for example, analytic as well as continental aesthetics/philosophy, art education, architecture and urban planning, music, cinema, environmental aesthetics, literary theory, neuroscience and psychology of art, contemporary art, Marxist aesthetics, calligraphy, history of aesthetics, and digital art. Notable was also the occurrence of numerous sections on dance aesthetics, which usually have not been as prominent in other congresses of aesthetics which I have attended so far. Due to the vast number of presentations held at numerous parallel sessions, it is obviously quite difficult to give an all-embracing outline of them. It would also seem to be somewhat unfair and arbitrary, I think, to pick out certain speakers, while at the same time ignoring other commendable presentations. It perhaps suffices to say that I personally found a great number of them utterly inspiring, touching upon important issues as well as giving new insights into the various domains of aesthetic research.

Not surprisingly, a great number of presentations of course dealt with Asian aesthetics, i.e. from Korea, Japan, India and, not least, China, itself. Several presentations attempted to elucidate differences as well as similarities between Western and Chinese aesthetics. One question that became apparent was in which way it might be reasonable to talk about a specific “Chinese aesthetics” rather than “aesthetics in China”. As a matter of fact, since the 19th century aesthetic research in China has to a considerable extent been influenced by Western traditions, such as the works of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Schopenhauer, Schiller and Nietzsche, just to mention a few philosophers whose works were translated into Chinese and became widely discussed in certain academic circles. Moreover, Marxist aesthetics was introduced as early as 1919 (when the Chinese “May Fourth” movement took place) and became especially prominent after the 1950’s when the Communist party under Mao Zedong came to power. On the other hand, aesthetic discussions in China had occurred as early as the 3rd century BC onwards, influenced by Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist thinking. A detailed discussion of traditional Chinese aesthetics would unfortunately go beyond the scope of this report, but we may note that rather holistic views of nature and humankind were embraced and artistic practices attempted to resonate with nature as well as the social landscape. Generally speaking, much less emphasis is put on originality, individuality and the expression of personal feelings compared with Western aesthetical ideals.

While some of the Chinese main speakers’ lectures were simultaneously translated into English (portable transmitting devices with earphones were available for this purpose), most of the Chinese presentations were not, thus being incomprehensible to most foreign participants. For obvious reasons this was unfortunate, as – judging from the titles – a great number of them might have given non-Chinese listeners substantial and important insights into Chinese culture and artistic practices. However, there were numerous possibilities for informal meetings and inspiring discussions besides the actual lecture sessions. Apart from meetings at the congress venues and during the lunches, two large banquets with exquisite Chinese cuisine were arranged. One especially noteworthy highlight of the congress took place one afternoon when bus excursions to the Forbidden City and to the Quing emperors’ Summer Palace, respectively, took place and also provided many opportunities for discussion. Another cultural highpoint was an aesthetically absolutely overwhelming dance performance one evening by members of the Beijing Dance Academy. Moreover, at the university library an exhibition took place showing traditional Chinese arts and crafts as well as calligraphy. At the congress main venue, another exhibition of contemporary (though, I think, hardly controversial) Chinese painting could also be seen.

In concluding, then, I would say that this congress was well-organized. It provided many opportunities for stimulating intellectual and personal meetings, as well as outstanding aesthetic experiences, and it had a generally friendly and open-minded atmosphere. In these respects, the Beijing congress indeed met the high standards already set at the exceptionally well-arranged congresses in Tokyo 2001 and in Ankara 2007. All of the presentations are intended to be issued on a CD, while a selection of them will be published in book form. Hopefully, these publications will also include translations of (at least some of) the Chinese presentations into English. So, there is every reason to congratulate the congress organizers, most notably perhaps Gao Jianping, Peng Feng, Ye Lang, and Zhu Liangzhi, and all involved persons, not least the student volunteers, on this very successful gathering.

The next International Congress of Aesthetics will take place in Kraków, Poland in 2013.[5]



[1] Venice 1956, Athens 1960, Amsterdam 1964, Uppsala 1968, Bucharest 1972, Darmstadt 1976, Dubrovnik 1980, Montreal 1984, Nottingham 1988.

[2] Further information about the IAA can be obtained at its website: http://www2.eur.nl/fw/hyper/IAA/

[5] I would like to thank Jos de Mul and Arnold Berleant for their helpful comments on an earlier draft on this report.